My perspective has changed… with my move to Cape Cod Massachusetts

Nauset Beach waves Cape Cod HouseI have moved to Harwich, Massachusetts on Cape Cod. Instead of living 4 miles from Long Island Sound in Connecticut, I now live 1 mile from Nantucket Sound in Harwich. I have some connections with Cape Cod, having visited off and on for the last 40 years, and even did a coastal geology study at Longnook beach in Truro and Nauset beach in Orleans…while in college.

Right off the bat, I noticed that this can be considered “big sky” country of a sort…The trees are a bit stunted and there is little light from the towns resulting in wonderful views of the stars at night, especially when at the beach.

I love the glacial creation story that is Cape Cod… here is what Wikipedia says..

The bulk of the land on Cape Cod consists of glacial landforms, formed by terminal moraine and outwash plains. This represents the southernmost extent of glacial coverage in southeast New England; similar glacial formations make up Long Island in New York and Block Island in Rhode Island. Together, these formations are known as the Outer Lands, or more obscurely as the “Isles of Stirling”. Geologically speaking, Cape Cod is quite young, having been laid down some 16,000 to 20,000 years ago.

Most of Cape Cod’s geological history involves the advance and retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet in the late Pleistocene geological era and the subsequent changes in sea level. Using radiocarbon dating techniques, researchers have determined that around 23,000 years ago, the ice sheet reached its maximum southward advance over North America, and then started to retreat. Many kettle ponds – clear, cold lakes – were formed and remain on Cape Cod as a result of the receding glacier. By about 18,000 years ago, the ice sheet had retreated past Cape Cod. By roughly 15,000 years ago, it had retreated past southern New England. When so much of Earth’s water was locked up in massive ice sheets, the sea level was lower. Truro’s bayside beaches used to be a petrified forest, before it became a beach

As the ice began to melt, the sea began to rise. Initially, sea level rose quickly, about 15 metres (49 ft) per 1,000 years, but then the rate declined. On Cape Cod, sea level rose roughly 3 metres (9.8 ft) per millennium between 6,000 and 2,000 years ago. After that, it continued to rise at about 1 metre (3.3 ft) per millennium. By 6,000 years ago, the sea level was high enough to start eroding the glacial deposits that the vanished continental ice sheet had left on Cape Cod. The water transported the eroded deposits north and south along the outer Cape’s shoreline through a process known as longshore drift. Those reworked sediments that moved north went to the tip of Cape Cod. The entire town of Provincetown, at the extreme tip of the Cape, is a spit consisting largely of deposited marine sediment that was eroded and transported from farther south along the shore. Those sediments that instead moved south created the islands and shoals of Monomoy. So while other parts of the Cape have dwindled from the action of the waves, these parts of the Cape have grown through the deposition of sediment in just the last 6,000 years.

More about life on the Cape ….

Advertisements

About Don Segal

See Commentary, Photos, Drawings and Poetry on my blog at donsegal.wordpress.com.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Cape Cod, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s